Showing posts with label innovation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label innovation. Show all posts

Monday, July 24, 2017

Which Registry will succeed in...

...selling domain names in supermarkets?
When it comes to paying in a supermarket, you're often offered to buy that “little thing more”: chewing-gums, sweets, alcohol, but it is now also possible to buy “online things” such as Apple and Google music: why not offer domain names too?


Domains names are no BtoC consumer products
Let’s be serious: can you imagine a Registry pushing a Registrar to “do the job”, trying to offer domain names in supermarkets? This just would not work for several reasons:
  • Approaching a supermarket chain is a tough job that requires time and the job of a Registrar is to sell domain names and offer services dedicated to domain names;
  • What about marketing and packaging: who pays? Certainly not the supermarket chain! Which Registrar has the capacity to pay for all this but one which has a close link to a supermarket chain?
  • What about pricing? Is a Registrar ready to drop its price or accept to earn money in year two, when the domain name is renewed?
  • What about support...
A blog offered with a domain name is BtoC
Many people want to have their blog: to post their holidays’ photos or just to write the story of their life but they won’t necessary search for this on Internet because it is so difficult to understand and there is so much info to provide, it can even become technical!

The truth is that very few people know what a domain name is so you can imagine when it comes to talking about a “Registrar” :-)

Added to more services, a supermarket has the capacity to address end users and evangelize the process of registering a domain name a complete different way, make things more simple and go straight to the point: deliver what is offered on the packaging and nothing more that what the price says. It does not work the same online when you can offer “options”, simply by clicking on a button. The more clicks...

A supermarket also has the capacity to offer “trust” in the purchase: the seller is already an authority, can Registrars says the same: nationwide?

Why not add the email to this package?
Another truth is that very few people know that an email can be different from gMail or Hotmail so offering the option to personalize an email with a domain name seriously adds to the quality of the offer.

Let’s be honest, what looks nicer: jguillon@hotmail.com or jean@guillon.email ? What about this one for "Jovenet Consulting": www.jovenetconsulting.com or www.jovenet.consulting ?

Added to the domain name, a personalized email is typically what Google and many other Registrars are trying to achieve in their offers but a supermarket could demonstrate that it is even a better place to bring consumers to buy such products: it is faster and does not require to read it all.

So what is the solution then?
I studied various possibilities but I strongly believe that the best approach is with a Registry which operates its own Registrar. The reason for this? A better price and reduced costs to take care of all operations with a limited number of subsidiaries. Note that I will not explain about “a better price”.

A Registrar with the capacity to offer a complete solution and a dedicated path for such consumers:
  1. The Blog (without ever mentioning the word “hosting”);
  2. The Domain name;
  3. The Email;
  4. One yearly payment.
A coupon, such as the one offered to buy music, will offer:
  • To pay for year one;
  • A 3 lines explanation of what the consumer buys;
  • A short URL where to:
    • Create the domain name which will activate and point to the Blog;
    • Create the email;
    • Explain and point to the interface to Blog;
    • Renew the domain name (renewing should be explained on the coupon).
The entire process should fit in one single page.

Who can do that?
Come on: don’t you see?
;-)


*BtoC stands for “Business to Consumer”, different from BtoB which stands for “Business to Business”

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

New gTLDs: how they incite innovation

We thought new gTLDs would bring innovation to the world of domain names, but has it been the case? Clearly not...and this for two reasons:
  1. It took too long for many projects to be validated by the ICANN and launched;
  2. It cost too much Registries to wait and money dedicated to innovation went to...you know...when you have to pay your staff while waiting, etc...                     :-)
We also thought that innovation would be sudden but it appears that it is taking longer.


Is innovation coming now?

Clearly yes.

I see new kind of projects coming which did not exist because of the non existence of new gTLDs. All use and/or focus on new domain names:
  • Tools to operate large portfolios of domain names with a minimum number of clicks: some Trademarks now want to find a use for all of these new domains they have to secure*;
  • Tools dedicated to the meaning of specific TLDs (.email - .club - ...);
  • Directories dedicated to specific domain name extensions: the interesting thing about new gTLDs is that some extensions now clearly mean something and help identify the content of a website directly when reading the domain name;
  • Search engines for specific TLD meanings: why not search an info about a Contractor in a search engine dedicated to ".contractors" domain names?
  • "Gain sharing" focussing on specific TLDs: a method to help Registries Registrants generate an income from a specific domain name extension;
  • Mad scientists projects**.
Some registries are still having a hard time to make their project profitable but this is what is driving creativity today. There are failures with, for example, attempts to flood the market creating new domain names with no content; but little by little, we see that registries are not necessary - as we imagined it - the one to deliver creativity: registrants and entrepreneurs are now the one to take the lead. 

Rebranding is innovation
According to Verisign, it appears that ".com" was originally created to represent the “commercial” intent of a website so now there is a ".search" domain name extension, does it mean that it is time for Google to change its extension to perfectly match with what it is really doing?
What about The Time: isn't it time to change to a ".news" or ".press" to clearly express what it is about, or does it have to stick to that old speech about ".com" domain names and SEO?
Some Trademarks are showing initiatives:
By the way, what sounds best here: "innovation is branding" or "branding is innovation"? Don't both sound good thank to new gTLDs?

We are interested in talking about your new gTLD innovation, contact us if interested. 

* conceived by Jovenet Consulting
** some are clearly imagined at Jovenet Consulting ;-)

Thursday, June 15, 2017

I don't understand GOOGLE for new gTLDs

Google now offers a simple way to have a website (a sort of presentation page) in its My Business offer so I went through the procedure, clicked on "Website" and I ended with this: http://jovenet.business.site/


A good start?
If course, I won't be using this as a website since it is pretty ugly (apologies for the ugly photos but I cannot even decide to remove them) but, this is not what it is made for. This free "website" offer is there to help those who don't know how to create a website and who just need to be able to be listed somewhere...in Google. A simple webpage can sometimes make it.

What I misunderstand
Google submitted plenty of new gTLD applications and offers a service using the domain name it registered from...another Registry. Yes, the .SITE new gTLD does not belong to Google but to someone else: why not use the .NEW, the .HERE or the .PAGE new gTLDs which belong to Google??? It could even have found a use for the .GOOG Top-Level Domain!
Also note that Google applied for the .SITE new gTLD but then withdrew its application after it lost it in an auction. Wrong move?

Come on Google: show some innovation here
Unless I am wrong, using sub-domains to introduce a website is "the old fashion way": no one does this anymore so:
  1. Why not offer to register a domain name and point it to this "My Business" website offer? Note that Google Registrar only offers to register domain names when in...the United States and a very few other countries.
  2. Why not offer to map an existing domain name? I searched for it this but the option does not exist...
The G-Suite offer from Google really helps me to operate my small company: I found such a complete offer "to do it all" in no other place and I am happy to pay for this. This is what I called innovation when I took the decision to use "Google Apps" (at the time) instead of the Microsoft Office suite or the extremely complex Amazon offer but today, I need more. I want to be able to buy a SSL certificate for my domain name with G-Suite, I want to be able to buy domain names from Google Registrar to centralize everything but nothing comes and there is still no visibility after so many years: why?

Google entered the domain name business thank to new gTLDs and I believe that this was a great move because...it is useful to me: a small company. What I still misunderstand is what is blocking Google from delivering more innovation using the new gTLDs it applied for?

In need of ideas?

Sunday, December 6, 2015

The new gTLD info of the day (Week-end)

New domain names underdevelopment
Below is another look at a few developed sites on the new gTLDs. Screenshots are linked to the sites if you’d like to check them out for yourself.
http://domainshane.com/new-gtld-development-clearer-link-volo-global-various-property/

After a Record Sales Month .CLUB Will Have a Lot of Domains in Our Next Weekly Report
A day after our latest weekly domain sales report came out Wednesday (December 2),.CLUB announced they had a record-breaking month in November, booking just over$1,622,000 worth of premium domain sales.
http://www.dnjournal.com/archive/lowdown/2015/dailyposts/20151204.htm#.VmMQe1gzIt4.twitter

New gTLDs recently delegated:
  1. 3 December 2015: ".INSURANCE";
  2. 3 December 2015 ".NORTON";
  3. 3 December 2015 ".MED";
  4. 3 December 2015 ".SYMANTEC".
    http://newgtlds.icann.org/en/program-status/delegated-strings
Night.club
Nine "Category Killer" .CLUB Web Addresses Including Strip.club and Fitness.club to Be Offered January 11, 2016 in Las Vegas
http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/-2079436.htm

Now Available In Chinese!
State of the Domains, the magazine that is published by the Domain Name Association, is now available in Chinese. It was translated from the original English version that was distributed at ICANN 54.
http://onlinedomain.com/2015/12/06/news/state-of-the-domains-magazine-now-available-in-chinese/


Nameshield Corporate Registrar: Corporate domain name portfolio management
The Nameshield Group: Registry, Corporate and Retail Registrar

Most recent Trademark Clearinghouse Sunrise Period announcements

Monday, March 23, 2015

New gTLDs innovation and registration volumes: the .UNO solution

New gTLD innovation
Hasn't it been a little disappointing to see absolutely no (or very few) innovation coming with new domain names?
One would have expected a .EMAIL new gTLD to come with a little plus something related to fighting spam or a .HELP coming with a dedicated platform to offer help on demand (is this what Google will offer with its .HOW?), a .DIRECTORY already set-up to login and create a directory, or a .INTERNATIONAL with a special partnership with a multilingual CMS?

I heard good ideas from Mind + Machines years ago but so many delays in launching the ICANN new gTLD program seem to have killed innovation.

Today, innovation in new gTLDs seems to work hand in hand with sales results and if it has been difficult to finance while the ICANN and the GAC were spending applicants' time and money to (try to) solve problems, it is possible that this innovation has now become the key to reach financial expectations and develop new domain names adoption.

The .UNO initiative
The .UNO Registry (".UNO has universal recognition for being number one, first, unique and the best") is about to have sold 10.000 new domain names and giving domain names away seems to be a new way to "deliver" names on the market.
If some Registries like the .XYZ, .BERLIN and .SCIENCE are giving domain names, the .UNO Registry is bringing innovation to this new trend giving the domain name for free with the Hello.uno new social platform.

Hello.uno
Hello.uno is a free service not owned by the .UNO Registry but which allows anyone to create a complete webpage on which the Registrant can show his LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and many other social networks feeds. All this in just a few clicks.

The increasing number of subscribers is a demonstration of success. I wanted to go through the process and created a jeanguillon.uno. It took me less than five minutes for a complete page. I also received the email which confirmed the domain name registration:


I checked a little later to find my webpage online. It is basic and I will probably dig a little more into it to see what more can be done with it.

Of course, "free is rarely free" so I checked the WHOIS database to see if the domain had been registered in my name and it had. As a result, a newcomer to this platform gets everything the Google Blogger platform offers but with a super clean design and a free domain name. Blogger - which I already find very cool - will charge you for the domain name and Wordpress will charge you even more.

In the case of this platform, "free" seems to be definition I have of this word, not the one which comes with adds. If someone finds the trick here, I am interested in a feed-back.

Registration volumes
A lot has been told about poor domain names renewal (read here too) but...is this so true and...does it really matter?

From where I stand at Jovenet Consulting, one of my weekly tasks is to check domain name renewals and what I see is not negative at all. If results are not the one expected, renewals are there: there are less domain names on the market than expected by Registries but Registrants (those to register domain names) are renewing their domain(s).
One year (more or less) after launching its first TLDs, the last report from the largest multiple Registry Donuts tells us one truth about renewals.

So regarding registration volumes, the repetitive and negative speech I often read from Domainers and "pro .COMs" is ... just wrong :-)

What about increasing new domain names registration volumes? If I now have very small doubts about the renewal rate from a Registry who is giving domain names away, I have even smaller ones about one giving a little something with its domains for two reasons:
  1. When you start to use a service like Hello.uno, chances are high that you will keep using it:
    1. Choices of designs offered are:
      1. Really nice;
      2. Free.
    2. The domain name is Free and registered in your name: you normally pay for this.
  2. A platform like Hello.com can become addictive: you get everything in one single place: no need multiple logins and passwords... Internet users also like it when it is simple.
In the case of the Hello.uno platform, the thinking seems to be done a different way: the message sent to me is more a: "use our platform and we will give you a personalized address with it" rather than a: "register this domain for free then decide what to do with it".

Register your Trademark using an agent.